People

Professor

Curriculum Vitae

W. Bradford Wilcox

PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY

W. Bradford Wilcox is Director of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia,  Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia, Senior Fellow at the Institute for Family Studies, and a Visiting Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

As an undergraduate, Wilcox was a Jefferson Scholar at the University of Virginia (’92) and later earned his Ph.D. from Princeton University. Prior to coming to the University of Virginia, he held research fellowships at Princeton University, Yale University, and the Brookings Institution.

The coauthor of Gender and Parenthood: Biological and Social Scientific Perspectives (Columbia, 2013, with Kathleen Kovner Kline), Professor Wilcox’s research has focused on marriage, fatherhood, and cohabitation, especially on the ways that family structure, civil society, and culture influence the quality and stability of family life in the United States and around the globe. Now, Dr. Wilcox is exploring the contribution that families make to the economic welfare of individuals and societies. He is also the coauthor of Whither the Child?: Causes and Consequences of Low Fertility (Paradigm, 2013, with Eric Kaufmann) and the author of Soft Patriarchs, New Men: How Christianity Shapes Fathers and Husbands (Chicago, 2004). Wilcox has published articles on marriage, cohabitation, parenting, and fatherhood in The American Sociological Review, Social Forces, The Journal of Marriage and Family and The Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. Wilcox is now writing a book with Nicholas Wolfinger titled, Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Children, & Marriage among African Americans and Latinos (Oxford 2015).

Brad Wilcox has received the following two awards from the American Sociological Association Religion Section for his research: the Best Graduate Paper Award and the Best Article Award. His research has also been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC News, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, USA Today, The Boston Globe, CNN, The Los Angeles TimesCBS NewsNBC's The Today Show, and on NPR. He also writes regularly for publications like The Wall Street Journal.

Bradford Wilcox teaches courses in statistics, family, and religion. You can follow Professor Wilcox @WilcoxNMP.

For his recent popular writings or articles about his work, see:

Selected Publications

Books

Journal Articles

W. Bradford Wilcox.  2011. “If Momma Ain’t Happy: Explaining Declines in Marital Satisfaction Among New Mothers.” Journal of Marriage and Family 73: 1-12. (With Jeffrey Dew).

W. Bradford Wilcox 2011. “Motherhood and Marriage: A Response.” Journal of Marriage and Family 73: 29-32. (With Jeffrey Dew).

What's love got to do with it? Equality, equity, commitment and women's marital quality. Social Forces, vol. 84, no. 3, March 2006, pp. 1321-1345.  

Happily Ever After?: Religion, Marital Status, Gender and Relationship Quality in Urban Families. Social Forces, vol. 86, no. 3, March 2008, pp. 1311-1337.

Measure of American Religion: Toward Improving the State of the Art, The; Steensland, Brian; Park, Jerry Z.; Regnerus, Mark D.; Robinson, Lynn D.; Wilcox, W. Bradford; Woodberry, Robert. 79 Social Forces. 291 (2000-2001)

Listing of top journal articles by W. Bradford Wilcox

Working Papers

"No Money, No Honey, No Church"

Office

University of Virginia Sociology Department
Randall 110
P.O. Box 400766
Charlottesville, VA 22904

Office Hours

Wednesdays 9:00 - 11:00 am

Phone | Fax

(434) 924-0588 | (434) 924-7028

Web

www.wbradfordwilcox.com

Email

wbw7q@virginia.edu

Courses

Undergraduate Level

  • SOC 2052 (252) - Sociology of the Family
  • SOC 3130 (311/313) - Introduction to Social Statistics
  • SOC 4052 (452) - Sociology of Religious Behavior
  • SOC 4057 (457) - Family Policy

Graduate Level

  • SOC 5020 - Intro to Statistics
  • SOC 5120 (512) - Intermediate Statistics
  • SOC 5057 - Sociology of Family
  • SOC 7130 (711/713) - Introduction to Social Statistics
  • SOC 8052 (852/552) - Sociology of Religion